Tag Archives: Australia

Laughing Kookaburra

Laughing Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae Order: Coraciiformes Family: Alcedinidae  Overview Laughing kookaburras are the largest member of the kingfisher family and are a dynamic species that can be presented in a variety of educational forums. They have several natural behaviors that can be demonstrated during programming, including flight, calling, and prey stunning. The laughing kookaburra SSP is also very willing to

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Blue Tongued Skink

Tiliqua scincoides Order: Squamata Family: Scincidae There are 3 subspecies of Tiliqua scincoides, Australian blue-tongued skink [1] T. s. chimaerea, Tanimbar blue-tongued skink, T. s. intermedia, northern blue-tongued skink, T. s. scincoides, eastern blue-tongued skink Natural History Information Range and Habitat These skinks are crepuscular, and well adapted to borrowing and terrestrial habitats. They are able to withstand a wide

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Eclectus Parrot

Eclectus roratus Order: Psittaciformes Husbandry Information Housing Requirements Standard bird cages, bigger is generally better. Be sure it is not made out of galvanized metal because the zinc in the galvanizing is toxic to birds. Diet Requirements In the wild, Eclectus parrots eat fruit, nuts, seeds, berries, flowers, and nectar. In captivity, they are fed pellets, fruit, vegetables, seeds, and mealworms.

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Sugar glider

Petaurus breviceps Order: Marsupialia Husbandry Information Housing Requirements A multi-level enclosure with a variety of climbing structures can help provide exercise. Diet Requirements In the wild, sugar gliders eat sap, blossoms, nectar, insects, and small invertebrates. In captivity, sugar gliders are fed baby juice, sugar glider biscuits, crickets, mealworms, fruits, and vegetables. Veterinary Concerns Notes on Enrichment & Training Commercially available

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Kangaroo, Red

Macropus rufus Order: Diprodontia Husbandry Information Housing Requirements Open space without too many obstacles. Shelter from rain. They really like lying on heat pads in cold weather. Diet Requirements Hay, herbivore pellets, fresh produce such as lettuce, yams, apples. Veterinary Concerns Kangaroos in captivity are prone to tooth and mouth problems, often called lumpy jaw disease. Notes on Enrichment & Training

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Woma Python

Aspidites ramsayi Order: Squamata Husbandry Information Housing Requirements Temperature, Humidity, & Lighting: Temperature: Humidity: Lighting: Substrate: Diet Requirements Veterinary Concerns Notes on Enrichment & Training Check out the Reptelligence Facebook page and Reptelligence website for enrichment and training inspiration. Advancing Herpetological Husbandry July 2018 Quarterly Newsletter- Article Environmental Enrichment for Reptiles By Charlotte James Other Colony or Breeding Management Notes species is housed or managed socially or

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White’s Tree Frog

Litoria caerulea Order: Anura Husbandry Information Housing Requirements Diet Requirements In the wild, White’s tree frogs eat mostly insects and spiders, although they will also take small frogs and small mammals, as long as they will fit inside their mouths. In captivity, they are fed crickets. Though gut-loaded crickets dusted with calcium and vitamins are their preferred food, they can

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Cockatiel

Cockatiel Nymphicus hollandicus Order: Psittaciformes Family: Cacatuidae Overview With regard to their availability and suitability as ambassador animals: Cockatiels do not need to be hand-reared from hatch to make good ambassador birds, in fact, allowing birds to remain with their parents until weaned makes for a healthier individual in many cases – both physically and mentally. Parent reared birds can

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Blue-tongued Skink

Tiliqua scincoides Order: Squamata There are 3 subspecies of Tiliqua scincoides, Australian blue-tongued skink [1]  T. s. chimaerea, Tanimbar blue-tongued skink, T. s. intermedia, northern blue-tongued skink, T. s. scincoides, eastern blue-tongued skink Husbandry Information Housing Requirements Blue-tongued skinks can be easily housed in plastic commercial reptile enclosures, minimum size for adults approximately 32″ by 18″. Skinks are reclusive so should

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